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Tag: academic language

Comparing and Contrasting with MLs

Comparing and Contrasting with MLs

Learning how to compare and contrast are higher-order thinking skills and an important component of reading comprehension. They are also a great way for students to practice language skills and build academic language. When students compare they look for things that are the same. When they contrast they look for items that are different. Here are some activities to introduce comparing and contrasting to students. Comparing and Contrasting with Pictures Show students two sets of pictures. Have them compare and…

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Academic Language Teaching Ideas for ELLs

Academic Language Teaching Ideas for ELLs

Academic language is the language of school. Tier 2 vocabulary words that are found across different subject areas are components of academic language. For English language Learners, it is particularly important to develop their academic language. For English Language Learners who are new to the country, it can take from seven to ten years for them to learn academic language. Johnson (2012) stats that “for ELL’s Academic language is a third language that they must learn.” For students learning English,…

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Strategies for Helping ELLs that were Born in the US

Strategies for Helping ELLs that were Born in the US

English Language Learners come from a diverse set of backgrounds. There is a large segment of ELLs that were born in the United States. US-born ELLs come from a wide range of backgrounds. Some of them are the children of recent immigrants, some grow up in poverty, some quickly acquire bilingual literacy skills. The linguistic, cultural, and economic background of an ELL impacts how quickly they acquire English. One misconception is that those that are bilingual have equal proficiency in…

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Improving the Speaking Skills of English Language Learners

Improving the Speaking Skills of English Language Learners

Speaking in a new language can be a frightening experience.  English Language Learners often feel embarrassed that they will make mistakes or are nervous about being misunderstood. This can result in newcomers going through a silent period (when they do not speak but are learning a large amount of language).  Even ELLs that have a higher language level can become intimidated during whole class discussions.  Brain science can help explain this response. The emotional system of our brain does not…

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